People who live to 100 have unique gut bacteria signatures

Home News (Image credit: Shutterstock)People who live to age 100 and beyond may have special gut bacteria that help ward off infections, according to a new study from Japan.The results suggest that these bacteria, and the specific compounds they produce — known as “secondary bile acids” — could contribute to a healthy gut and, in…

Purification of multiplex oligonucleotide libraries by synthesis and selection

AbstractComplex oligonucleotide (oligo) libraries are essential materials for diverse applications in synthetic biology, pharmaceutical production, nanotechnology and DNA-based data storage. However, the error rates in synthesizing complex oligo libraries can be substantial, leading to increment in cost and labor for the applications. As most synthesis errors arise from faulty insertions and deletions, we developed a…

Bioorthogonal information storage in l-DNA with a high-fidelity mirror-image Pfu DNA polymerase

1.Pasteur, L. Researches on the Molecular Asymmetry of Natural Organic Products (Société Chimique de Paris, 1860) Reprint No. 14 (Alembic Club, 1905).2.Wang, Z., Xu, W., Liu, L. & Zhu, T. F. A synthetic molecular system capable of mirror-image genetic replication and transcription. Nat. Chem. 8, 698–704 (2016).CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar  3.Peplow, M. Mirror-image enzyme…

First sign of animal life on Earth may be a sponge fossil

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Canadian geologist may have found the earliest fossil record of animal life on Earth, according to a report published Wednesday in the journal Nature.Around a billion years ago, a region of northwest Canada now defined by steep mountains was a prehistoric marine environment where the remains of ancient sponges may be…

The Fine Line Between Reality and Imaginary

We all live in two worlds: a world outside of ourselves containing things that others can also see and hear and touch, and a world inside consisting of our thoughts and imaginations, which only exist in our own mind. Usually, we effortlessly keep these two worlds apart. But a recent study I ran together with…

T-knife—unleashing T-cell receptors on cancer

After 17 years of painstaking work, this year Thomas Blankenstein, founder of the Berlin-based start-up T-knife, will finally see how his T cell receptor (TCR) cancer immunotherapy works in real life. The idea was conceptually simple and not entirely original: replace the TCR genes of a mouse with those from a human, as had previously…

High-throughput mapping of a whole rhesus monkey brain at micrometer resolution

AbstractWhole-brain mesoscale mapping in primates has been hindered by large brain sizes and the relatively low throughput of available microscopy methods. Here, we present an approach that combines primate-optimized tissue sectioning and clearing with ultrahigh-speed fluorescence microscopy implementing improved volumetric imaging with synchronized on-the-fly-scan and readout technique, and is capable of completing whole-brain imaging of…

French astronomers explore supercluster PLCK G334.8-38.0

X-ray and tSZ emission of the triplet-cluster system PLCK G334.8-38.0. Credit: Kolodzig et al., 2021. Using ESA’s XMM-Newton telescope, a team of French astronomers has conducted an X-ray study of a supercluster known as PLCK G334.8-38.0. Results of this research, published July 16 on the arXiv pre-print server, deliver important insights into the nature of…

Nobel prize-winning physicist Steven Weinberg dies at 88

KEN MILLER, Associated PressJuly 24, 2021Updated: July 24, 2021 7:58 p.m. 1of3FILE – In this Oct. 15, 1979, file photo, professor Steven Weinberg, of Cambridge, Mass., poses for a picture. Weinberg, the 1979 winner of the Nobel prize in physics with two other scientists for their work unlocking mysteries of tiny particles, has died at 88. Spokesperson…