Marketers, don’t overlook emojis: Monday’s daily brief thumbnail

Marketers, don’t overlook emojis: Monday’s daily brief

Good morning, Marketers, and how would you build a marketing ops certification program?

If you’re hiring for a marketing ops role, what are you looking for? And can those qualities be captured within a formal certification procedure?

That was a big topic of conversation at the second day of the Mo Pros Summer Camp in Atlanta, as attendees explored the idea of developing a vendor-agnostic marketing ops certification. The vendor-agnostic part is tricky, of course. A candidate for a position might come armed with Marketo, HubSpot or Salesforce certification, for example, but does that tell you whether they have an overall understanding of the marketing ops framework. What’s more, do they have the soft skills which are essential to work across marketing, sales, perhaps IT and other functions?

On the other hand, how does a non-vendor run certification program offer practical, hands-on experience of using the tools? These are the questions the Mo Pros folks are mulling, and the outcome should be interesting.

Kim Davis

Editorial Director

Answer our new survey on attending or exhibiting at in-person events

Pre-pandemic life is starting to return. Travel is up. Masks are coming off. And indoor dining is an option once more.

The relaxation in pandemic restrictions is also rippling through the business world as conferences and trade shows schedule in-person events for this summer and fall. We’re not surprised, since the last edition of our Events Participation Index showed that many marketers were ready to hit the conference hall floor as early as the third quarter of 2021.

But a sizable number of marketers still seemed luke-warm to the idea of business travel, which is why we are once again asking marketers to share their sentiments on returning to in-person events.

Please click here to take our 3-minute survey.

We will publish the results in the coming weeks on MarTech.

Why your marketing campaigns need more emojis

New data from Adobe indicates that the missing element to all your marketing issues is … emojis. Ok, maybe not exactly, but this article from Anna Meyer in Inc. indicates that they’re at least “a secret weapon in marketing, customer service, and social media.”

For World Emoji Day (it was Saturday, sorry we missed it, y’all), Adobe looked into how emojis in marketing affect email open rates, purchasing, and more. Ready for some of the most interesting stats?

  • Over half of those surveyed feel more comfortable using emoji than talking on the phone or in-person (do not call me, maybe)
  • Emojis help people overcome language barriers and form connections that would otherwise be difficult to do (emojis are a universal language)
  • Sixty percent of all emoji users–and 70 percent of Gen-Z users–say they are likely to open email or push notifications that contain emojis

The data is global — collected from 7,000 people in the U.S., UK, Germany, France, Japan, Australia, and South Korea. If you haven’t tested an emoji or two in your marketing, now might be the time to try! 😉

Quote of the day

“I don’t just look at how brands handle complaints online. I also look for how they handle customer love. Put out the fires, but also water the flowers too.” Christina Garnett, community builder and strategist, HubSpot

About The Author

Kim Davis is the Editorial Director of MarTech. Born in London, but a New Yorker for over two decades, Kim started covering enterprise software ten years ago. His experience encompasses SaaS for the enterprise, digital- ad data-driven urban planning, and applications of SaaS, digital technology, and data in the marketing space.

He first wrote about marketing technology as editor of Haymarket’s The Hub, a dedicated marketing tech website, which subsequently became a channel on the established direct marketing brand DMN. Kim joined DMN proper in 2016, as a senior editor, becoming Executive Editor, then Editor-in-Chief a position he held until January 2020.

Prior to working in tech journalism, Kim was Associate Editor at a New York Times hyper-local news site, The Local: East Village, and has previously worked as an editor of an academic publication, and as a music journalist. He has written hundreds of New York restaurant reviews for a personal blog, and has been an occasional guest contributor to Eater.


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